Bulimia

Virtual Bulimia Treatment Program

Nourish is the easiest way to find a personalized program for patients with bulimia and get it covered by your insurance. We provide virtual sessions with a registered dietitian to help you take control of your eating disorder.

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Find recovery from your eating disorder

If you are concerned that you – or a loved one – may have an eating disorder, we are here to help.

a woman by the ocean with her son.Bulimia

Nourish is the easiest way to find a personalized program for patients with bulimia and get it covered by your insurance. We provide virtual sessions with a registered dietitian to help you take control of your eating disorder.

Overcome Binge Eating Disorder

Your dedicated dietitian will work with you to create an individualized treatment plan that implements proven ways to overcome binge eating disorder. Your care plan will take into account all aspects of your BED journey and your life to best meet your needs.

Convenient, virtual appointments

Receive the highest quality care wherever you are most comfortable. You get access to your dietitian virtually anytime, anywhere. No more driving to appointments. No more waiting around. Just join your video call and immediately get high quality care.

Coordination with your care team

We know it’s important to have ongoing collaboration with your care team - that’s why coordination of care is a key pillar at Nourish. We work with your other health care professionals to ensure a single, consistent approach to the eating disorder recovery process.

Adrien
Adrien
Paczosa
Adrien Paczosa is a Registered and Licensed Dietitian practicing in Austin, Texas and the surrounding counties. She is the founder of I Live Well Nutrition and is also the founder of Fearless Practitioners, a business that offers training to dietitians and wellness professionals. Adrien is a Certified Eating Disorders Registered Dietitian (CEDRD). She began her path towards nutrition by falling down. She has been dancing since age two and in college was a Kilgore College Rangerette. During a practice she took a fall and broke her foot, and that sparked the ideas of needing a new direction in her life. After graduating in 2003 from the University of Illinois – Chicago with a bachelor of science degree in Human Nutrition, Adrien began her career as a staff dietitian at hospital in downtown Chicago. In 2006, Adrien returned to Texas to be close to family, friends, and warmer weather! She opened her private practice, I Live Well Nutritional Therapy in 2007 and it has only continued to grow.
Brandy
Brandy
Stayman
I am an RD who has been in practice for 13 years. I am passionate about helping people form and maintain a healthy relationship to food when addressing their health and nutrition challenges. I especially love working with individuals on intuitive eating, women's health issues such as PCOS and prenatal nutrition, disordered eating, and eating disorders. My practice style can be described as nonjudgmental and compassionate. Outside of being a dietitian, I have a strong passion for travel and trying new experiences! I also love spending time with my husband and two dogs!
Libby
Libby
Hill
Libby graduated from UT Austin with a degree in human biology and went to work in clinical trial research, which quickly taught her that her passion is in prevention and counseling toward therapeutic lifestyle changes. Libby returned to her alma mater to study nutrition and completed my dietetic internship at the UT Coordinated Program in Dietetics and has been helping others find a better relationship with food and their bodies ever since. As a former collegiate athlete and certified personal trainer, she’s passionate about nutrition counseling for athletes suffering from eating disorders. She also has a special interest in helping individuals with medical conditions or allergies that limit their diets navigate the kitchen and promote quality of life. She strives to be the most inclusive practitioner possible and provide a safe space for people of all genders and gender identities, races, religions, and sexual orientations. In her spare time, Libby wears many hats! As a former Miss Earth USA, she used her pageant title to organize coastal restoration projects and promote sustainable food systems. She loves to develop and cook what she calls “planet-based” meals, which use ethically sourced, sustainable ingredients to promote the health of the environment and (coincidentally) the body! When the workday ends, you’ll likely catch Libby hiking, wakesurfing, volunteering for a veteran non-profit, modeling for size-inclusive brands, or loving on her three animals.
Liz
Liz
Satterthwaite

Liz has diverse experience in providing nutrition services and counseling. Her passion for nutrition comes from her own personal struggles and she prides herself on being able to help others make nutrition work for them and to build a better and sustainable relationship with food and their body.

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Bulimia

What is Bulimia? 

Bulimia nervosa (also known as just bulimia) is a serious eating disorder characterized by a cycle of binging and behaviors such as self-induced vomiting to compensate for the effects of binge eating.

Bulimia affects 1-2% of adolescent and young adult women and 80% of patients are female. People with bulimia usually appear to be of average body weight and recognize that their behaviors are unusual. Bulimia is frequently associated with symptoms of depression and changes in social adjustment, and people with bulimia may attach self-esteem to body image and feel out of control during binge-eating episodes.

Bulimia is a serious condition that can have severe complications if left untreated. With treatment, however, you can take back control of your body image and eating habits and manage the risks of living with bulimia.

What’s the Difference Between Anorexia and Bulimia?

The principal difference between anorexia and bulimia is that while a person with anorexia takes extreme measures to lose weight or avoid gaining weight, a person with bulimia employs strategies to consistently purge food from their body after an episode of binge eating by taking laxatives or making themselves throw up. People with anorexia and people with bulimia both tend to fixate on their body weight and shape and have trouble accurately assessing their body image. 

Bulimia Signs and Symptoms 

Some of the warning signs of bulimia include:

  • Evidence of binge eating: Disappearance of large amounts of food in short periods of time, finding wrappers and containers.
  • Evidence of purging behaviors: Frequent trips to the bathroom after meals, signs and/or smells of vomiting, presence of laxatives or diuretics packages.
  • Excessive, rigid exercise regimen despite weather, fatigue, illness, or injury; compulsive need to “burn off” calories
  • Unusual swelling of the cheeks or jaw area.
  • Calluses on the back of the hands and knuckles from self-induced vomiting.
  • Discoloration or staining of the teeth.
  • Creation of lifestyle schedules to make time for binge-and-purge sessions.
  • Withdrawal from usual friends and activities.
  • Behaviors and attitudes indicating that weight loss, dieting, and control of food are becoming primary concerns.

Click here to read more about other symptoms of bulimia.

Causes of Bulimia

The exact cause of bulimia is not fully understood, but a number of factors may contribute to its development.

One possible cause of bulimia is a combination of genetic, environmental, and social factors. Research suggests that people with certain genes may be more prone to developing bulimia and other eating disorders. Additionally, certain environmental and social factors, such as a history of trauma or abuse, low self-esteem, or a culture that places a high value on thinness, may increase the risk of developing bulimia.

Other potential causes of bulimia include psychological issues, such as anxiety, depression, or perfectionism, as well as physiological factors, such as imbalances in brain chemicals that regulate appetite and mood. It is also possible that bulimia may be triggered by dieting or attempts to control weight, which can lead to a cycle of binging and purging behaviors.

Bulimia Health Risks

Bulimia nervosa can be extremely harmful to the body.  The binge-and-purge cycles can damage the entire digestive system, the heart and other major organ functions.  Some of the health consequences include:

  • Electrolyte imbalances (caused by dehydration from purging) can lead to irregular heartbeats and heart failure
  • Inflammation
  • Rupture of the esophagus from frequent vomiting
  • Tooth decay and staining from stomach acids released during vomiting
  • Chronic irregular bowel movements and constipation from laxative abuse
  • Gastric rupture is an uncommon but possible side effect of binge eating

Helping Someone with Bulimia:

If you have a friend or family member that is struggling with bulimia, there are a few things you can do to support them:

  • Set aside a time for a private meeting with your friend to discuss your concerns openly and honestly in a caring, supportive way.
  • Ask your friend to explore these concerns with a counselor, doctor, nutritionist, or other health professional.
  • Avoid placing shame, blame, or guilt on your friend regarding their actions or attitudes and avoid giving simple solutions.
  • Remind your friend that you care and want your friend to be healthy and happy and express your continued support.

Bulimia Treatment 

The right approach for bulimia treatment typically depends on the severity of your condition as well as your age, overall health, medical history, and other factors. In more severe cases, urgent medical care is needed to address physical health complications. 

Nutrition counseling from a registered dietitian that specializes in eating disorders is a critical part of recovering and managing your bulimia. The specialized bulimia treatment team at Nourish will work with you to understand biological, psychological and social contributors to your eating disorder. Your treatment team will seek to understand the psychological issues that contribute to your eating disorder and help identify and treat root causes.

At Nourish, we have a team of bulimia dietitians that specialize in working with patients at all stages of recovery. We offer nutrition counseling over telehealth and accept insurance in order to make accessing care as easy and affordable as possible. Click here to find your dietitian today and begin your recovery journey. 

Binge Eating Disorder Signs and Symptoms

Binge eating disorder is often associated with symptoms of depression. There are several signs that someone might be battling with BED, including insisting on eating alone, overeating when not hungry, or eating until uncomfortably full. Episodes of binge eating are usually followed by feelings of guilt or shame, and often lead to more serious health complications.

Bulimia
Bulimia

Causes of Binge Eating Disorder

Binge eating disorder (BED) is caused by a complex combination of genetic, psychological and cultural factors. Family history, long term dieting, and a disrupted relationship with food may increase the risk of binge eating disorder. Binge eating disorder sufferers often struggle with co-occurring mood and anxiety disorders, have experienced some kind of trauma, or struggle to navigate developmental milestones and life changes.

Binge Eating Disorder Health Risks

There are serious health risks associated with binge eating disorder (BED), including: Cardiovascular disease, Type II diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome as well as Sleep Disorders, GI Disorders, Pain Disorders, Menstrual Dysfunction and Pregnancy Complications. That’s why it’s important to recognize that BED is a mental health illness, not a matter of trying to exercise more self-control.

Bulimia

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Virtual Bulimia Treatment Program

Adrien Paczosa, RD, LD, CEDRD-S
Chief Clinical Officer
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

What is Bulimia? 

Bulimia nervosa (also known as just bulimia) is a serious eating disorder characterized by a cycle of binging and behaviors such as self-induced vomiting to compensate for the effects of binge eating.

Bulimia affects 1-2% of adolescent and young adult women and 80% of patients are female. People with bulimia usually appear to be of average body weight and recognize that their behaviors are unusual. Bulimia is frequently associated with symptoms of depression and changes in social adjustment, and people with bulimia may attach self-esteem to body image and feel out of control during binge-eating episodes.

Bulimia is a serious condition that can have severe complications if left untreated. With treatment, however, you can take back control of your body image and eating habits and manage the risks of living with bulimia.

What’s the Difference Between Anorexia and Bulimia?

The principal difference between anorexia and bulimia is that while a person with anorexia takes extreme measures to lose weight or avoid gaining weight, a person with bulimia employs strategies to consistently purge food from their body after an episode of binge eating by taking laxatives or making themselves throw up. People with anorexia and people with bulimia both tend to fixate on their body weight and shape and have trouble accurately assessing their body image. 

Bulimia Signs and Symptoms 

Some of the warning signs of bulimia include:

  • Evidence of binge eating: Disappearance of large amounts of food in short periods of time, finding wrappers and containers.
  • Evidence of purging behaviors: Frequent trips to the bathroom after meals, signs and/or smells of vomiting, presence of laxatives or diuretics packages.
  • Excessive, rigid exercise regimen despite weather, fatigue, illness, or injury; compulsive need to “burn off” calories
  • Unusual swelling of the cheeks or jaw area.
  • Calluses on the back of the hands and knuckles from self-induced vomiting.
  • Discoloration or staining of the teeth.
  • Creation of lifestyle schedules to make time for binge-and-purge sessions.
  • Withdrawal from usual friends and activities.
  • Behaviors and attitudes indicating that weight loss, dieting, and control of food are becoming primary concerns.

Click here to read more about other symptoms of bulimia.

Causes of Bulimia

The exact cause of bulimia is not fully understood, but a number of factors may contribute to its development.

One possible cause of bulimia is a combination of genetic, environmental, and social factors. Research suggests that people with certain genes may be more prone to developing bulimia and other eating disorders. Additionally, certain environmental and social factors, such as a history of trauma or abuse, low self-esteem, or a culture that places a high value on thinness, may increase the risk of developing bulimia.

Other potential causes of bulimia include psychological issues, such as anxiety, depression, or perfectionism, as well as physiological factors, such as imbalances in brain chemicals that regulate appetite and mood. It is also possible that bulimia may be triggered by dieting or attempts to control weight, which can lead to a cycle of binging and purging behaviors.

Bulimia Health Risks

Bulimia nervosa can be extremely harmful to the body.  The binge-and-purge cycles can damage the entire digestive system, the heart and other major organ functions.  Some of the health consequences include:

  • Electrolyte imbalances (caused by dehydration from purging) can lead to irregular heartbeats and heart failure
  • Inflammation
  • Rupture of the esophagus from frequent vomiting
  • Tooth decay and staining from stomach acids released during vomiting
  • Chronic irregular bowel movements and constipation from laxative abuse
  • Gastric rupture is an uncommon but possible side effect of binge eating

Helping Someone with Bulimia:

If you have a friend or family member that is struggling with bulimia, there are a few things you can do to support them:

  • Set aside a time for a private meeting with your friend to discuss your concerns openly and honestly in a caring, supportive way.
  • Ask your friend to explore these concerns with a counselor, doctor, nutritionist, or other health professional.
  • Avoid placing shame, blame, or guilt on your friend regarding their actions or attitudes and avoid giving simple solutions.
  • Remind your friend that you care and want your friend to be healthy and happy and express your continued support.

Bulimia Treatment 

The right approach for bulimia treatment typically depends on the severity of your condition as well as your age, overall health, medical history, and other factors. In more severe cases, urgent medical care is needed to address physical health complications. 

Nutrition counseling from a registered dietitian that specializes in eating disorders is a critical part of recovering and managing your bulimia. The specialized bulimia treatment team at Nourish will work with you to understand biological, psychological and social contributors to your eating disorder. Your treatment team will seek to understand the psychological issues that contribute to your eating disorder and help identify and treat root causes.

At Nourish, we have a team of bulimia dietitians that specialize in working with patients at all stages of recovery. We offer nutrition counseling over telehealth and accept insurance in order to make accessing care as easy and affordable as possible. Click here to find your dietitian today and begin your recovery journey. 

Discover a healthier, happier you.

  • Covered by insurance
  • Registered dietitians
  • Virtual sessions
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